Home Food How To Cook Lobster Tails in 2020 (step by step)

How To Cook Lobster Tails in 2020 (step by step)

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Here’s a fun fact: 50% of lobster purchasers actually don’t know how to cook lobster tails! Ever since Maine Lobster Now™ first opened its doors, our customers have been asking us how to perfectly boil, broil, bake, steam, or grill their lobster tails. Cooking lobster tails at home is part of the fun! We recommend that you start by searching for the perfect lobster tail within our huge inventory of regular or jumbo lobster tails and our mouth-watering lobster dinner side dishes!

With our easy-to-use lobster tail boiling, grilling and broiling guides below, you’ll find that cooking lobster tails is a rewarding experience the whole family will want to experience again and again. Check out our lobster tail recipes section to find out better techniques on how to butterfly a lobster tail! We intentionally only stock cold-water lobster tails, if you are interested in learning the difference between cold-water and warm-water lobster tails check out our blog for more information.

Terms before start cooking lobster tails

Here are some great tips so you can have the best results when cooking your tails. If you carefully follow our instructions on how to cook lobster tails, you will look and cook like a pro! Don’t worry, for most people cooking lobster tails is a new experience. When your lobster tails arrive, they will be brown in color and the inside of the tail will be a gray color. This is a lobster’s natural and lobster tails do not turn red until they are cooked!

Thaw Your Tails Thoroughly To Avoid Meat Sticking to the Shell

If you want to avoid your tails sticking to the shell, thaw your tails 24 hours prior to cooking in a refrigerator inside a leak-proof container. Your tails are defrosting so they will leak fluid. If your tails are frozen and you are cooking today, that is not a problem, just keep your lobster tails in a sealed bag and soak in cold water for at least 30-60 minutes. Larger tails will take longer to thaw. If you want to butterfly a lobster tail, thawing your tails will be critical because you will have to cut the meat, and you won’t be able to do so if the tails are not thawed all the way.

Common Misconceptions which you can do:

It is common to have a tomalley in the center of the tail. It appears black and sometimes green and sometimes will startle customers. Do not worry. This is a natural part of the lobster tail. It is actually the liver and is totally edible and is considered a delicacy. If you do not desire to eat this it can be rinsed off with water once the lobster is fully cooked.

The most lobster tail meat is white but it is also common to have a slight pink tint to the meat for lobsters that are preparing to shed. Once again, this is a totally natural process and is totally edible. If you want to remove the pink tint, you can rinse most of it off with warm water after you have cooked your tail.

How to Steam Lobster Tails at Home

Steaming lobster tails is another great option when deciding the best cooking option for you and your family. This cooking method is faster than boiling and is arguably the most traditional way. Since you are actually cooking at a higher temperature, it’s even more critical not to overcook your tails.

Lobster Tails Steaming Instructions

Lobster Tails Steaming Instructions

Choose a pot large enough to hold your lobster tails with a tight-fitting lid that is large enough to fit the lobster tails with enough room for the steam to circulate around them.

Place a steamer basket or an upturned colander in the pot so lobster tails are not submerged in the water.

Pour in cold water to a depth of about 2 inches.

Cover your pot and bring water to a boil.

Once the water is boiling, quickly add the lobster tails to the pot and cover.